What are contractions in English grammar and speaking?

In today’s post we are going to have a look at contractions, we shall see how you can save time and ink.
We use contractions (I’m, we’re) in everyday English. Contractions are sometimes called ‘short forms’, and generally they combine a pronoun or noun and a verb, or a verb and not, in a shorter form. Be warned that contractions are usually not appropriate in formal writing.

Generally, we make auxiliary verbs, and verb to be . All we do is put an apostrophe in place of a missing letter or letters like shown below.

TO BE

  1. I am – I’m
  2. He/She is – He’s/She’s
  3. It is – It’s
  4. We are – We’re
  5. You are – You’re
  6. Is not – Isn’t
  7. Are not – Aren’t
  8. Was not – Wasn’t
  9. Were not – Weren’t
  10. Where are – Where’re
  11. Who is – Who’s
  12. Where is – Where’s
  13. How was-- How’s
  14. How is – How’s
  15. That is – That’s
  16. That was – That’s

TO HAVE

  1. I have-- I’ve
  2. She has – She’s
  3. He has – He’s
  4. They have-- They’ve
  5. We have-- We’ve
  6. It has – It’s
  7. Where have – Where’ve
  8. Who have – Who’ve
  9. How have – How’ve

HAD

  1. It had–It’d
  2. She had–She’d
  3. We had–We’d
  4. He had-- He’d
  5. They had-- They’d
  6. These had – These’d
  7. That had-- That’d
  8. Who had – Who’d
  9. Which had --Which’d
  10. What had – What’d
  11. Where had --Where’d
  12. Had not-- Hadn’t

MODAL VERBS

  1. Would have – Would’ve
  2. Could have – Could’ve
  3. Should have --Should’ve
    If I missed any add it in the comments below. :hugs: